FELLINI'S 100TH BIRTHDAY MEME

In association with Umbrella Entertainment Australia we could not be more happier than to celebrate what would of been the Italian auteur's 100th birthday with a duo of unforgotten masterpieces at the Lumiere....


8 1/2

Marcello Mastroianni plays Guido Anselmi, a director whose new project is collapsing around him, along with his life. One of the greatest films about film ever made, Federico Fellini’s 8 1/2 (Otto e mezzo) turns one man’s artistic crisis into a grand epic of the cinema. An early working title for 8 1/2 was The Beautiful Confusion, and Fellini’s masterpiece is exactly that: a shimmering dream, a circus, and a magic act.

8 1/2

Marcello Mastroianni plays Guido Anselmi, a director whose new project is collapsing around him, along with his life. One of the greatest films about film ever made, Federico Fellini’s 8 1/2 (Otto e mezzo) turns one man’s artistic crisis into a grand epic of the cinema. An early working title for 8 1/2 was The Beautiful Confusion, and Fellini’s masterpiece is exactly that: a shimmering dream, a circus, and a magic act.
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La Dolce Vita

Fellini fans, rejoice. The maestro’s 1960 exposé of Roman society high and low, La dolce vita returns in a stunning new restoration. “Once you’ve caught a glimpse of it, it’s where you want to live.” — NY Times Quite possibly the world’s best known ‘foreign-language’ film, his 1960 La dolce vita is the latest beneficiary of Gucci and The Film Foundation’s film restoration programme. Both ageless and utterly of its time in condemning the modern decadence it so stylishly flaunts, the film that coined the term paparazzo stars Marcello Mastroianni as jaded Marcello, a journalist pursuing the good life in Rome at the dawn of the 60s. Condemned by the Vatican, the film was an international succès de scandale.

The film’s iconic images – the statue of Christ being flown over Rome, Anita Ekberg frolicking in the Trevi Fountain – are instantly recognisable symbols of Italian society in glamorous dissolution. Nino Rota’s score is just as indelible. Otello Martelli’s sparkling black-and-white widescreen cinematography has never looked better than in this stunning restoration. — Bill Gosden NZIFF

La Dolce Vita

Fellini fans, rejoice. The maestro’s 1960 exposé of Roman society high and low, La dolce vita returns in a stunning new restoration. “Once you’ve caught a glimpse of it, it’s where you want to live.” — NY Times Quite possibly the world’s best known ‘foreign-language’ film, his 1960 La dolce vita is the latest beneficiary of Gucci and The Film Foundation’s film restoration programme. Both ageless and utterly of its time in condemning the modern decadence it so stylishly flaunts, the film that coined the term paparazzo stars Marcello Mastroianni as jaded Marcello, a journalist pursuing the good life in Rome at the dawn of the 60s. Condemned by the Vatican, the film was an international succès de scandale.

The film’s iconic images – the statue of Christ being flown over Rome, Anita Ekberg frolicking in the Trevi Fountain – are instantly recognisable symbols of Italian society in glamorous dissolution. Nino Rota’s score is just as indelible. Otello Martelli’s sparkling black-and-white widescreen cinematography has never looked better than in this stunning restoration. — Bill Gosden NZIFF
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