REWIND MOVIE MAGIC


They’re some of the most influential and best-loved films, but many of us didn’t get to experience them as they were meant to be seen. Some of us know them only as chewed up VHS tapes; the luckiest of us are yet to discover them. 

All generations whether X, Y or Z can be transported back to when they were originally released in the splendour of original size and surroundings . As Dustin Hoffman said "Mrs Robinson, you're trying to seduce me.”, so join us at the Lumiere soon to relax , rewind and unwind…

-Nick Paris

A Woman is a Woman

A French striptease artist is desperate to become a mother. When her reluctant boyfriend suggests that his best friend impregnate her, feelings become complicated when she accepts.

A Woman is a Woman

A French striptease artist is desperate to become a mother. When her reluctant boyfriend suggests that his best friend impregnate her, feelings become complicated when she accepts.
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Angel Heart

Set in 1955, in NYC, where the mysterious Louis Cyphre (Robert De Niro) hires a second-rate Brooklyn divorce specialist investigator, the private detective Harry Angel (Mickey Rourke), to find a missing crooner named Johnny Favorite, who reneged on fulfilling his contract. The disheveled private dick gets paid handsomely for his efforts that take him on a strange and dangerous soul-searching journey to a Poughkeepsie mental hospital, Harlem, Coney Island in the winter, New Orleans and the Louisiana bayou. The tale comes with a Satanic cult twist, as Angel traces the pop singer’s disappearance when he was a soldier in 1943 and hospitalized Poughkeepsie because of traumatic amnesia. After interviewing those who could lead him to Johnny, Angel discovers that they are ritually murdered in a cultish gruesome fashion and the detective becomes the patsy who is setup as the killer. A Stunning 4k Restoration presentation at the Lumiere..

Angel Heart

Set in 1955, in NYC, where the mysterious Louis Cyphre (Robert De Niro) hires a second-rate Brooklyn divorce specialist investigator, the private detective Harry Angel (Mickey Rourke), to find a missing crooner named Johnny Favorite, who reneged on fulfilling his contract. The disheveled private dick gets paid handsomely for his efforts that take him on a strange and dangerous soul-searching journey to a Poughkeepsie mental hospital, Harlem, Coney Island in the winter, New Orleans and the Louisiana bayou. The tale comes with a Satanic cult twist, as Angel traces the pop singer’s disappearance when he was a soldier in 1943 and hospitalized Poughkeepsie because of traumatic amnesia. After interviewing those who could lead him to Johnny, Angel discovers that they are ritually murdered in a cultish gruesome fashion and the detective becomes the patsy who is setup as the killer. A Stunning 4k Restoration presentation at the Lumiere..
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Contempt (Le Mepris)

A philistine in the art film business, Jeremy Prokosch (Jack Palance) is a producer unhappy with the work of his director. Prokosch has hired Fritz Lang (as himself) to direct an adaptation of "The Odyssey," but when it seems that the legendary filmmaker is making a picture destined to bomb at the box office, he brings in a screenwriter (Michel Piccoli) to energize the script. The professional intersects with the personal when a rift develops between the writer and his wife (Brigitte Bardot).

Contempt (Le Mepris)

A philistine in the art film business, Jeremy Prokosch (Jack Palance) is a producer unhappy with the work of his director. Prokosch has hired Fritz Lang (as himself) to direct an adaptation of "The Odyssey," but when it seems that the legendary filmmaker is making a picture destined to bomb at the box office, he brings in a screenwriter (Michel Piccoli) to energize the script. The professional intersects with the personal when a rift develops between the writer and his wife (Brigitte Bardot).
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South Pacific (1958)

Nurse Nellie Forbush (Mitzi Gaynor) of the U.S. Navy falls for middle-aged French plantation owner Emile De Becque (Rossano Brazzi), but recoils upon discovering that he's fathered two mixed-race children. When Nellie leaves him, the heartbroken Emile agrees to take on a dangerous espionage mission. In his absence, Nellie struggles to reconcile her prejudices with her love for him -- and after she spends time with his children and comes to care for them, fears that Emile may not return alive.

South Pacific (1958)

Nurse Nellie Forbush (Mitzi Gaynor) of the U.S. Navy falls for middle-aged French plantation owner Emile De Becque (Rossano Brazzi), but recoils upon discovering that he's fathered two mixed-race children. When Nellie leaves him, the heartbroken Emile agrees to take on a dangerous espionage mission. In his absence, Nellie struggles to reconcile her prejudices with her love for him -- and after she spends time with his children and comes to care for them, fears that Emile may not return alive.
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T2: Trainspotting

First there was an opportunity......then there was a betrayal. Twenty years have gone by. Much has changed but just as much remains the same. Mark Renton (Ewan McGregor) returns to the only place he can ever call home. They are waiting for him: Spud (Ewen Bremner), Sick Boy (Jonny Lee Miller), and Begbie (Robert Carlyle). Other old friends are waiting too: sorrow, loss, joy, vengeance, hatred, friendship, love, longing, fear, regret, diamorphine, self-destruction and mortal danger, they are all lined up to welcome him, ready to join the dance.

T2: Trainspotting

First there was an opportunity......then there was a betrayal. Twenty years have gone by. Much has changed but just as much remains the same. Mark Renton (Ewan McGregor) returns to the only place he can ever call home. They are waiting for him: Spud (Ewen Bremner), Sick Boy (Jonny Lee Miller), and Begbie (Robert Carlyle). Other old friends are waiting too: sorrow, loss, joy, vengeance, hatred, friendship, love, longing, fear, regret, diamorphine, self-destruction and mortal danger, they are all lined up to welcome him, ready to join the dance.
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The French Connection (1971)

"The French Connection" is routinely included, along with "Bullitt," "Diva" and "Raiders of the Lost Ark," on the short list of movies with the greatest chase scenes of all time. What is not always remembered is what a good movie it is apart from the chase scene. It featured a great early Gene Hackman performance that won an Academy Award, and it also won Oscars for best picture, direction, screenplay and editing.

The movie is all surface, movement, violence and suspense. Only one of the characters really emerges into three dimensions: Popeye Doyle Gene Hackman, a New York narc who is vicious, obsessed and a little mad. The other characters don't emerge because there's no time for them to emerge. Things are happening too fast.

The story line hardly matters. It involves a $32 million shipment of high-grade heroin smuggled from Marseilles to New York hidden in a Lincoln Continental. A complicated deal is set up between the French people, an American money man and the Mafia. Doyle, a tough cop with a shaky reputation who busts a lot of street junkies, needs a big win to keep his career together. He stumbles on the heroin deal and pursues it with a single-minded ferocity that is frankly amoral. He isn't after the smugglers because they're breaking the law; he's after them because his job consumes him.

Director William Friedkin constructed "The French Connection" so surely that it left audiences stunned. And I don't mean that as a reviewer's cliché: It is literally true. In a sense, the whole movie is a chase. It opens with a shot of a French detective keeping the Continental under surveillance, and from then on the smugglers and the law officers are endlessly circling and sniffing each other. It's just that the chase speeds up sometimes, as in the celebrated car-train sequence.

In "Bullitt," two cars and two drivers were matched against each other at fairly equal odds. In Friedkin's chase, the cop has to weave through city traffic at 70 m.p.h. to keep up with a train that has a clear track: The odds are off-balance. And when the train's motorman dies and the train is without a driver, the chase gets even spookier: A man is matched against a machine that cannot understand risk or fear. This makes the chase psychologically more scary, in addition to everything it has going for it visually. - Roger Ebert

The French Connection (1971)

"The French Connection" is routinely included, along with "Bullitt," "Diva" and "Raiders of the Lost Ark," on the short list of movies with the greatest chase scenes of all time. What is not always remembered is what a good movie it is apart from the chase scene. It featured a great early Gene Hackman performance that won an Academy Award, and it also won Oscars for best picture, direction, screenplay and editing.

The movie is all surface, movement, violence and suspense. Only one of the characters really emerges into three dimensions: Popeye Doyle Gene Hackman, a New York narc who is vicious, obsessed and a little mad. The other characters don't emerge because there's no time for them to emerge. Things are happening too fast.

The story line hardly matters. It involves a $32 million shipment of high-grade heroin smuggled from Marseilles to New York hidden in a Lincoln Continental. A complicated deal is set up between the French people, an American money man and the Mafia. Doyle, a tough cop with a shaky reputation who busts a lot of street junkies, needs a big win to keep his career together. He stumbles on the heroin deal and pursues it with a single-minded ferocity that is frankly amoral. He isn't after the smugglers because they're breaking the law; he's after them because his job consumes him.

Director William Friedkin constructed "The French Connection" so surely that it left audiences stunned. And I don't mean that as a reviewer's cliché: It is literally true. In a sense, the whole movie is a chase. It opens with a shot of a French detective keeping the Continental under surveillance, and from then on the smugglers and the law officers are endlessly circling and sniffing each other. It's just that the chase speeds up sometimes, as in the celebrated car-train sequence.

In "Bullitt," two cars and two drivers were matched against each other at fairly equal odds. In Friedkin's chase, the cop has to weave through city traffic at 70 m.p.h. to keep up with a train that has a clear track: The odds are off-balance. And when the train's motorman dies and the train is without a driver, the chase gets even spookier: A man is matched against a machine that cannot understand risk or fear. This makes the chase psychologically more scary, in addition to everything it has going for it visually. - Roger Ebert
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Trainspotting 1 + 2

Trainspotting (1996)..
A grimy bolt of celluloid lightning unspooling at 24 crackling frames a second, this episodic tale of smart-aleck Scottish lads on heroin is the year's most exciting film -- and surely its most controversial.

T2 Trainspotting ( 2017)..
Manages to be a deeper, more meaningful chapter in this brain-scrambled saga, enjoying the rush of nostalgia and renewed danger as it deals with a crisis that's more universal than substance abuse: aging.

Trainspotting 1 + 2

Trainspotting (1996)..
A grimy bolt of celluloid lightning unspooling at 24 crackling frames a second, this episodic tale of smart-aleck Scottish lads on heroin is the year's most exciting film -- and surely its most controversial.

T2 Trainspotting ( 2017)..
Manages to be a deeper, more meaningful chapter in this brain-scrambled saga, enjoying the rush of nostalgia and renewed danger as it deals with a crisis that's more universal than substance abuse: aging.
MORE / TRAILER

Pierrot le Fou

Pierrot escapes his boring society and travels from Paris to the Mediterranean Sea with Marianne, a girl chased by hit-men from Algeria. They lead an unorthodox life, always on the run.

Pierrot le Fou

Pierrot escapes his boring society and travels from Paris to the Mediterranean Sea with Marianne, a girl chased by hit-men from Algeria. They lead an unorthodox life, always on the run.
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Monty Python's Life of Brian

Monty Python delivers a scathing, anarchic satire of both religion and Hollywood's depiction of all things biblical with their 1979 feature film Life of Brian.

Highly controversial upon its original release and banned in several countries, the film is now frequently ranked as the greatest comedy feature of all time by magazines and media outlets around the world. As Monty Python member Terry Gilliam says, “It rips bare and makes you laugh at the world we’ve created for ourselves.”

Set in 33 A.D. Judea, where exasperated Romans are trying to impose some order, it is a time of chaos and change with no shortage of messiahs and followers willing to believe in them. At its centre is Brian Cohen, a reluctant would-be messiah who rises to prominence as a result of a series of absurd circumstances providing ample opportunity for the entire Monty Python ensemble (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin) to shine in multiple roles as they question everyone and everything from ex-lepers, Pontius Pilate and the art of haggling, to revolutionaries, crazy prophets, religious fanaticism, Roman centurions and crucifixion.

Monty Python's Life of Brian

Monty Python delivers a scathing, anarchic satire of both religion and Hollywood's depiction of all things biblical with their 1979 feature film Life of Brian.

Highly controversial upon its original release and banned in several countries, the film is now frequently ranked as the greatest comedy feature of all time by magazines and media outlets around the world. As Monty Python member Terry Gilliam says, “It rips bare and makes you laugh at the world we’ve created for ourselves.”

Set in 33 A.D. Judea, where exasperated Romans are trying to impose some order, it is a time of chaos and change with no shortage of messiahs and followers willing to believe in them. At its centre is Brian Cohen, a reluctant would-be messiah who rises to prominence as a result of a series of absurd circumstances providing ample opportunity for the entire Monty Python ensemble (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin) to shine in multiple roles as they question everyone and everything from ex-lepers, Pontius Pilate and the art of haggling, to revolutionaries, crazy prophets, religious fanaticism, Roman centurions and crucifixion.
MORE / TRAILER

Warriors (1979)

At just over 40 years now, this Walter Hill classic i saw at the Cinerama Theatre in Worcester St Christchurch about 1980... sitting in the stalls there amongst patched gang members you could feel the frisson of ahem 'excitement'... Soo here we are at the Lumiere where the street's sing their 2021 West Side Story sonnet... Transposed to a near futuristic gang-infested New York, The Warriors relates a journey of a group of Greek Soldiers who after the battle of Cunaxa (401 BC) found themselves isolated behind Persian enemy lines.

Warriors (1979)

At just over 40 years now, this Walter Hill classic i saw at the Cinerama Theatre in Worcester St Christchurch about 1980... sitting in the stalls there amongst patched gang members you could feel the frisson of ahem 'excitement'... Soo here we are at the Lumiere where the street's sing their 2021 West Side Story sonnet... Transposed to a near futuristic gang-infested New York, The Warriors relates a journey of a group of Greek Soldiers who after the battle of Cunaxa (401 BC) found themselves isolated behind Persian enemy lines.
MORE / TRAILER

The Great Escape (1963)

This Anzac Day weekend we celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the actual true event called The Great Escape...

Only three of the men managed to escape to safety, while 50 of the 73 who were recaptured were killed.... An epic World War Two adventure, The Great Escape is based on an actual 1944 mass prison break from a German prisoner of war camp. Director and producer John Sturges goes big with an all-star cast and a running length close to three hours, and succeeds in delivering a stirring spectacle.

Tired of repeated and disruptive escapes by Allied prisoners, the German Luftwaffe build a new, theoretically escape-proof prison to hold captured air men. But by concentrating all the escape artists in one location, the Germans create a dream team of the best breakout men. Dedicated to tying up enemy forces by causing the biggest possible distraction, the prisoners organize themselves under the leadership of master escape plotter Roger Bartlett (Richard Attenborough), who devises a bold plan to liberate 250 prisoners by digging three tunnels (codenamed Tom, Dick and Harry) under the prison camp's fences and into the forest beyond.

The Great Escape (1963)

This Anzac Day weekend we celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the actual true event called The Great Escape...

Only three of the men managed to escape to safety, while 50 of the 73 who were recaptured were killed.... An epic World War Two adventure, The Great Escape is based on an actual 1944 mass prison break from a German prisoner of war camp. Director and producer John Sturges goes big with an all-star cast and a running length close to three hours, and succeeds in delivering a stirring spectacle.

Tired of repeated and disruptive escapes by Allied prisoners, the German Luftwaffe build a new, theoretically escape-proof prison to hold captured air men. But by concentrating all the escape artists in one location, the Germans create a dream team of the best breakout men. Dedicated to tying up enemy forces by causing the biggest possible distraction, the prisoners organize themselves under the leadership of master escape plotter Roger Bartlett (Richard Attenborough), who devises a bold plan to liberate 250 prisoners by digging three tunnels (codenamed Tom, Dick and Harry) under the prison camp's fences and into the forest beyond.
MORE / TRAILER

Dracula (1979)

A man washes ashore in England after a shipwreck and is found by Mina Van Helsing (Jan Francis). The man introduces himself as Count Dracula (Frank Langella) of Transylvania, and proceeds to integrate himself into the lives of Mina and her friend Lucy Seward (Kate Nelligan). However, when Mina dies and her father, Prof. Van Helsing (Laurence Olivier), attributes her death to a vampire, evidence indicates that Count Dracula is the monster, and Lucy is his next target.

Dracula (1979)

A man washes ashore in England after a shipwreck and is found by Mina Van Helsing (Jan Francis). The man introduces himself as Count Dracula (Frank Langella) of Transylvania, and proceeds to integrate himself into the lives of Mina and her friend Lucy Seward (Kate Nelligan). However, when Mina dies and her father, Prof. Van Helsing (Laurence Olivier), attributes her death to a vampire, evidence indicates that Count Dracula is the monster, and Lucy is his next target.
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The Cassandra Crossing ( 1976)

Terrorists have planted a deadly virus on a transcontinental train. On board are the glamorous Jennifer Chamberlain (Sophia Loren) and her ex-husband, Dr. Jonathan Chamberlain (Richard Harris), as well as Nicole Dressler (Ava Gardner) and her young lover, Robby (Martin Sheen). They can't get off, and one solution proposed is to quarantine them by rerouting the train over the Cassandra Crossing -- an unstable bridge. Dr. Chamberlain wants to save them, but has to battle the terrorists first.

The Cassandra Crossing ( 1976)

Terrorists have planted a deadly virus on a transcontinental train. On board are the glamorous Jennifer Chamberlain (Sophia Loren) and her ex-husband, Dr. Jonathan Chamberlain (Richard Harris), as well as Nicole Dressler (Ava Gardner) and her young lover, Robby (Martin Sheen). They can't get off, and one solution proposed is to quarantine them by rerouting the train over the Cassandra Crossing -- an unstable bridge. Dr. Chamberlain wants to save them, but has to battle the terrorists first.
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Breakfast at Tiffany's

A young New York socialite becomes interested in a young man who has moved into her apartment building, but her past threatens to get in the way.

Breakfast at Tiffany's

A young New York socialite becomes interested in a young man who has moved into her apartment building, but her past threatens to get in the way.
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Sorcerer (1977)

Sorcerer is Oscar-winner William Friedkin’s most visually stunning film, a nerve-wracking, sweat-inducing thriller following a gang of small-time crooks who sign on to drive a cargo of nitroglycerine through perilous terrain in a sweltering South American jungle. This riveting adaptation of the novel by Georges Arnaud, which also inspired Henri-Georges Clouzot’s French suspense classic The Wages of Fear (1953), is also director Friedkin’s favorite of all his films (no small compliment, given that his stellar filmography also includes such classics as The Exorcist and The French Connection), mainly because it came closer than any other to his original vision. Roy Scheider, Bruno Cremer, Francisco Rabal, and Amidou play four hard-luck losers who, for various reasons, cannot return to their own countries. They end up in a dismal South American town where an American oil company is seeking out courageous (i.e. foolish) drivers willing to haul nitroglycerin over 200 miles of treacherous terrain. The four stateless men have nothing to lose – and, besides, they’ll be paid $10,000 apiece, and be granted legal citizenship, if they survive. And that’s a BIG “if.” Originally conceived as a low-budget film, as Friedkin expanded his vision to include nail-biting sequences in which the trucks bounce across a rickety rope bridge and navigate treacherous mountain roads, location disasters ensued and the budget rose dramatically (much to the dismay of Paramount and Universal, who co-produced the film). Initially a critical and commercial failure, partly because of overwhelming competition from Star Wars (1977), and partly because of a curiously misleading title, Sorcerer has enjoyed a critical renaissance in recent years. Now hailed as one of the unsung masterpieces of the ’70s, the film has been praised for its economical storytelling, lavish production values and Friedkin’s expert manipulation of the themes of man vs. nature, fate and human responsibility. Featuring a pulsating music score by German electronic band Tangerine Dream, Sorcerer returns to the big screen in a new digital restoration that premiered to great acclaim at the 2013 Venice Film Festival.

Sorcerer (1977)

Sorcerer is Oscar-winner William Friedkin’s most visually stunning film, a nerve-wracking, sweat-inducing thriller following a gang of small-time crooks who sign on to drive a cargo of nitroglycerine through perilous terrain in a sweltering South American jungle. This riveting adaptation of the novel by Georges Arnaud, which also inspired Henri-Georges Clouzot’s French suspense classic The Wages of Fear (1953), is also director Friedkin’s favorite of all his films (no small compliment, given that his stellar filmography also includes such classics as The Exorcist and The French Connection), mainly because it came closer than any other to his original vision. Roy Scheider, Bruno Cremer, Francisco Rabal, and Amidou play four hard-luck losers who, for various reasons, cannot return to their own countries. They end up in a dismal South American town where an American oil company is seeking out courageous (i.e. foolish) drivers willing to haul nitroglycerin over 200 miles of treacherous terrain. The four stateless men have nothing to lose – and, besides, they’ll be paid $10,000 apiece, and be granted legal citizenship, if they survive. And that’s a BIG “if.” Originally conceived as a low-budget film, as Friedkin expanded his vision to include nail-biting sequences in which the trucks bounce across a rickety rope bridge and navigate treacherous mountain roads, location disasters ensued and the budget rose dramatically (much to the dismay of Paramount and Universal, who co-produced the film). Initially a critical and commercial failure, partly because of overwhelming competition from Star Wars (1977), and partly because of a curiously misleading title, Sorcerer has enjoyed a critical renaissance in recent years. Now hailed as one of the unsung masterpieces of the ’70s, the film has been praised for its economical storytelling, lavish production values and Friedkin’s expert manipulation of the themes of man vs. nature, fate and human responsibility. Featuring a pulsating music score by German electronic band Tangerine Dream, Sorcerer returns to the big screen in a new digital restoration that premiered to great acclaim at the 2013 Venice Film Festival.
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King Creole (1958)

In 1958 he released the third and arguably best film of his career, King Creole. Set in New Orleans, Presley plays 19-year-old Danny Fisher (a role originally intended for James Dean), who is struggling to graduate from high school when he accidentally stumbles into a singing career. Directed by Michael Curtiz and co-starring Walter Matthau, the film was primarily shot on location and is embroiled in the criminal underworld behind the cabaret scene of the French Quarter. It has an atmosphere of otherness, a pervading aura of the old world in a new land. Unlike his previous film, Jailhouse Rock, in which he plays a jerk, Danny is a sensitive, misunderstood young person pushed to the brink of despair due to circumstances....

King Creole (1958)

In 1958 he released the third and arguably best film of his career, King Creole. Set in New Orleans, Presley plays 19-year-old Danny Fisher (a role originally intended for James Dean), who is struggling to graduate from high school when he accidentally stumbles into a singing career. Directed by Michael Curtiz and co-starring Walter Matthau, the film was primarily shot on location and is embroiled in the criminal underworld behind the cabaret scene of the French Quarter. It has an atmosphere of otherness, a pervading aura of the old world in a new land. Unlike his previous film, Jailhouse Rock, in which he plays a jerk, Danny is a sensitive, misunderstood young person pushed to the brink of despair due to circumstances....
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Oklahoma!

In Oklahoma, several farmers, cowboys and a traveling salesman compete for the romantic favors of various local ladies.

Oklahoma!

In Oklahoma, several farmers, cowboys and a traveling salesman compete for the romantic favors of various local ladies.
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Laura (1944)

In one of the most celebrated 1940s film noirs, Manhattan detective Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews) investigates the murder of Madison Avenue executive Laura Hunt (Gene Tierney) in her fashionable apartment. On the trail of her murderer, McPherson quizzes Laura's arrogant best friend, gossip columnist Waldo Lydecker (Clifton Webb) and her comparatively mild fiancé, Shelby Carpenter (Vincent Price). As the detective grows obsessed with the case, he finds himself falling in love with the dead woman.

Laura (1944)

In one of the most celebrated 1940s film noirs, Manhattan detective Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews) investigates the murder of Madison Avenue executive Laura Hunt (Gene Tierney) in her fashionable apartment. On the trail of her murderer, McPherson quizzes Laura's arrogant best friend, gossip columnist Waldo Lydecker (Clifton Webb) and her comparatively mild fiancé, Shelby Carpenter (Vincent Price). As the detective grows obsessed with the case, he finds himself falling in love with the dead woman.
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The King and I

A widow accepts a job as a live-in governess to the King of Siam's children.

The King and I

A widow accepts a job as a live-in governess to the King of Siam's children.
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